Reblogged from thatkindofwoman with 1,114 notes / 01.09.14 / Permalink

My brother once showed me a piece of quartz that contained, he said, some trapped water older than all the seas in our world. He held it up to my ear. ‘Listen,’ he said, ‘life and no escape.’

Anne Carson, Plainwater (via theperfumemaker)
Reblogged from fuckyeahexistentialism with 928 notes / 01.09.14 / Permalink

The four children generally divided all grown-ups into four classes. There were ones who — frankly, and cruel as it might be to say it — just weren’t good with children at all. There was nothing to do about these, the four children felt, except to be as polite as possible and hope they would go away soon.

Then there were the ones who — when they were with children — always seemed to want to pretend they were children, too. This was no doubt kindly meant, but often ended with the four children’s feeling rather embarrassed for them.

Somewhat better were the opposite ones who went around treating children as though the children were as grown-up as they were, themselves. This was flattering, but sometimes a strain to live up to. Many of the four children’s school teachers fell into this category.

Last and best as rarest of all were the ones who seemed to feel that children were children and grown-ups were grown-ups and that was that, and yet at the same time there wasn’t any reason why they couldn’t get along perfectly well and naturally together, and even occasionally communicate, without changing that fact.

Half Magic, by Edward Eager

Some of the biggest truths I’ve ever learned were written in the novels of my childhood.

(via unabridged-tomes)

Loved this book as a kid.

(via iamlittlei)
Reblogged from iamlittlei with 27 notes / 30.08.14 / Permalink

(Source: goodnight-lenin)

Reblogged from funkypoolparty with 34,341 notes / 28.08.14 / Permalink
uchicagoadmissions:

asymptotejournal:

What are Borges, Heidegger and Jane Austen up to now? 
We’re loving the new series of illustrations at The Paris Review.

Never have I felt so smart as when linking to the Paris Review.

uchicagoadmissions:

asymptotejournal:

What are Borges, Heidegger and Jane Austen up to now?

We’re loving the new series of illustrations at The Paris Review.

Never have I felt so smart as when linking to the Paris Review.

Reblogged from uchicagoadmissions with 71 notes / 27.08.14 / Permalink

I am a woman
Phenomenally.
Phenomenal Woman,
That’s me.

Maya Angelou  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: goodreads.com)

Reblogged from thatkindofwoman with 1,376 notes / 26.08.14 / Permalink
nevver:

Don’t get me
Reblogged from funkypoolparty with 10,807 notes / 26.08.14 / Permalink
aseaofquotes:

Douglas Coupland, Life After God

aseaofquotes:

Douglas Coupland, Life After God

Reblogged from aseaofquotes with 2,706 notes / 24.08.14 / Permalink
anneyhall:

Evelyn Dean, 1934.
Photo by George Mann

anneyhall:

Evelyn Dean, 1934.

Photo by George Mann

Reblogged from anneyhall with 21 notes / 24.08.14 / Permalink

I learn a good deal by merely observing you, and letting you talk as long as you please, and taking note of what you do not say.

T.S. Eliot, The Cocktail Party  (via thatkindofwoman)

(Source: stxxz.us)

Reblogged from mstandsformorgan with 5,165 notes / 24.08.14 / Permalink

Last year, in total, British police officers actually fired their weapons three times. The number of people fatally shot was zero. In 2012 the figure was just one. Even after adjusting for the smaller size of Britain’s population, British citizens are around 100 times less likely to be shot by a police officer than Americans. Between 2010 and 2014 the police force of one small American city, Albuquerque in New Mexico, shot and killed 23 civilians; seven times more than the number of Brits killed by all of England and Wales’s 43 forces during the same period.

The explanation for this gap is simple. In Britain, guns are rare. Only specialist firearms officers carry them; and criminals rarely have access to them. The last time a British police officer was killed by a firearm on duty was in 2012, in a brutal case in Manchester. The annual number of murders by shooting is typically less than 50. Police shootings are enormously controversial. The shooting of Mark Duggan, a known gangster, which in 2011 started riots across London, led to a fiercely debated inquest. Last month, a police officer was charged with murder over a shooting in 2005. The reputation of the Metropolitan Police’s armed officers is still barely recovering from the fatal shooting of Jean Charles de Menezes, an innocent Brazilian, in the wake of the 7/7 terrorist bombings in London.

In America, by contrast, it is hardly surprising that cops resort to their weapons more frequently. In 2013, 30 cops were shot and killed—just a fraction of the 9,000 or so murders using guns that happen each year. Add to that a hyper-militarised police culture and a deep history of racial strife and you have the reason why so many civilians are shot by police officers. Unless America can either reduce its colossal gun ownership rates or fix its deep social problems, shootings of civilians by police—justified or not—seem sure to continue.

Reblogged from iamlittlei with 31,106 notes / 20.08.14 / Permalink

awidesetvagina:

this is still the best story ever told at a talk show

Reblogged from sheinhartwigcompany with 375,218 notes / 20.08.14 / Permalink
herfaultystars:

THIS. 

herfaultystars:

THIS. 

(Source: literallysame)

Reblogged from herfaultystars with 41,093 notes / 20.08.14 / Permalink

A Koala reflecting on his sins, his triumphs, and the inevitability of death.

Reblogged from tellthebees with 172,427 notes / 20.08.14 / Permalink

2damnfeisty:

"14-year-old Parkview High School Freshman, Caleb Christian was concerned about the number of incidents of police abuse in the news.  Still, he knew there were many good police officers in various communities, but had no way of figuring out which communities were highly rated and which were not.  

So, together with his two older sisters: Parkview High School senior Ima Christian, and Gwinnett School of Math, Science, and Technology sophomore, Asha Christian, they founded a mobile app development company– Pinetart Inc., under which they created a mobile app called Five-O.

Five-O, allows citizens to enter the details of every interaction with a police officer.  It also allows them to rate that officer in terms of courtesy and professionalism and provides the ability to enter a short description of what transpired.  These details are captured for every county in the United States. Citizen race and age information data is also captured.

Additionally, Five-O allows citizens to store the details of each encounter with law enforcement; this provides convenient access to critical information needed for legal action or commendation.”

Read more here. [x]

Black Excellence

(Source: skulls-and-tea)

Reblogged from iamlittlei with 91,676 notes / 17.08.14 / Permalink